emergency chords
Oct
1
2014

Reblogged from incandescent-skeleton :

bakrua:

bewbin:

Why do people drink alcohol it tastes disgusting

you don’t drink it for the taste. u drink shit like apple juice for the taste. you drink alcohol to get rid of the bad taste that every awful person in your life has left

Oct
1
2014

I need a cigarette rn more than I have ever

Sep
30
2014

i have drawing requests in my inbox and shit etc and i’m sorry i haven’t been posting them or anything else really. i’m going through a lot of shit right now. hopefully things will be more stable in the next week/week and a half ish.

also i probably won’t have internet for a while soon.

Sep
30
2014

Reblogged from wonderlandscorruption :

(Source: facesofdethklok)

Sep
30
2014
Sep
29
2014

Reblogged from shitsuren-chama :

pacificnorthwestdoodles:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.
She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.
"No… They don’t, actually."
"And how do you communicate, then?"
"Talking?"
"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"
"It is, sometimes."
"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.
But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”
It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.
i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.
little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

This includes my parents. “You can lipread and talk, you don’t need to know sign language!”
Lipreading is a chore. Many people ‘forget’ I’m hard of hearing. During conversation folks turn their heads or bodies away. I can’t lipread the back of your head. People try to talk to me across the room, down the hall, or by yelling outside. If my hearing relatives learned ASL, communicating with them would have been so much easier.
Ever since I learned ASL and met other people who could sign communication has been so much easier. I can finally understand people the first time. Other hard of hearing or deaf people I have befriended have told me their families did THE SAME THING with them. Their parents often didn’t learn sign.
Not knowing sign language has made accessing the Deaf community harder because I learned ASL as an adult. As a result, my proficiency is poor and most of the people I learn from are hearing rather than deaf or hard of hearing people.
Many of my friends are also hard of hearing or deaf. Thankfully they’ve been great at helping me get up to speed. Many hearing parents and hearing relatives don’t think ASL is important. Let me tell you—IT IS.

my ex roommate was deaf in one ear and used to be married to a deaf woman and he knew sign language fairly well. we had new neighbours move in with a deaf son and my roommate used to watch their son because he could actually communicate with him. the parents didn’t know any sign language and they ignore him and just put him in front of the tv or gave him an ipad instead of trying to interact with him in any way. i couldn’t believe that they wouldn’t even try to communicate with their son. but i guess their approach is more common…

pacificnorthwestdoodles:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.

She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.

"No… They don’t, actually."

"And how do you communicate, then?"

"Talking?"

"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"

"It is, sometimes."

"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.

But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”

It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.

i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.

little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

This includes my parents. “You can lipread and talk, you don’t need to know sign language!”

Lipreading is a chore. Many people ‘forget’ I’m hard of hearing. During conversation folks turn their heads or bodies away. I can’t lipread the back of your head. People try to talk to me across the room, down the hall, or by yelling outside. If my hearing relatives learned ASL, communicating with them would have been so much easier.

Ever since I learned ASL and met other people who could sign communication has been so much easier. I can finally understand people the first time. Other hard of hearing or deaf people I have befriended have told me their families did THE SAME THING with them. Their parents often didn’t learn sign.

Not knowing sign language has made accessing the Deaf community harder because I learned ASL as an adult. As a result, my proficiency is poor and most of the people I learn from are hearing rather than deaf or hard of hearing people.

Many of my friends are also hard of hearing or deaf. Thankfully they’ve been great at helping me get up to speed. Many hearing parents and hearing relatives don’t think ASL is important. Let me tell you—IT IS.

my ex roommate was deaf in one ear and used to be married to a deaf woman and he knew sign language fairly well. we had new neighbours move in with a deaf son and my roommate used to watch their son because he could actually communicate with him. the parents didn’t know any sign language and they ignore him and just put him in front of the tv or gave him an ipad instead of trying to interact with him in any way. i couldn’t believe that they wouldn’t even try to communicate with their son. but i guess their approach is more common…

Sep
29
2014

Reblogged from rammtwo :

ultrasheep:

Are male lunch ladies called lunch lords?

Sep
29
2014

i will never stop thinking of bonnie creeping his way down the hallway with his big goofy grin like “heh heh gonna get this guy this time heh”

but then foxy TAKING OFF DOWN THE HALLWAYS AS FAST AS his stupid robot feet will take him and totally barreling bonnie over onto the floor

and foxy just keeps going and slams into your door like HEY IM HERE TIME TO PLAY MOTHERFUCKER

and bonnie’s like picking himself off the floor like “no fair it was my turn”

Sep
29
2014
Sep
29
2014

Reblogged from mr-salacia-senpai :

obsessionsrosanahas:

We Shall Be Back!!!

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